Monthly Archives: August 2015

Book Review: The Original Jesus, by Daniel Darling

Without Jesus, there would be no Christianity, and so it is imperative that we know, to the extent that we are able, who we are talking about when we talk about him. In this book, Daniel Darling helps us to trade “the myths we create for the savior who is.”

I was intrigued by the chapter titles for this book, each one debunking a common label that Christians sometimes, consciously or unconsciously, apply to Jesus. These include, but are not limited to: Braveheart Jesus (the idea of the savior as the epitome of modern manliness), Prosperity Jesus (the “Jesus just wants you to be happy” trope), American Jesus, BFF Jesus, Legalist Jesus, etc.

For each one, the author mixes some personal experiences and observations with Scripture to present the problems and limitations or inconsistencies with each perception, and point us to passages and principles in Scripture that contradict our shallow labels. I could certainly nod my head in agreement at ideas and concepts I’ve seen in the culture around me, and also, unfortunately, in my own heart as well. This book is most definitely gospel-driven, but I didn’t feel the theology was too deep to understand or too heady to feel personal. The author also has a humorous voice when appropriate, which helps the book read in a conversational way.

This is a short book–only 160 pages including notes and introductory sections (are books getting shorter or is it just the English major in me?) There are parts that I felt could have been fleshed out more. Certainly, a separate book could probably be written on the subject of each chapter. But that’s not to say it isn’t as thorough as it can be for its length. Ultimately, the author hones in on the primary problem behind all of these labels in the first place:

“I’ll admit, I want to accept the Jesus who conforms to my image, the Jesus whose statements fit nicely on coffee mugs and T-shirts. But this safe, sanitized Jesus looks nothing like the real one, the one who came not to give me what I want but to rescue me from the kingdom of darkness. This Jesus, the real Jesus, is dangerous and unpredictable, calling me to lay aside my life and follow him regardless of what it costs. Jesus came not to conform to our desires but to transform us into his image.”

Even though this book primarily focuses on what Jesus is NOT, there is still room to succinctly spell out who he ultimately is, although this book is no substitute for reading about him in the gospels. But it is a good takedown of our cultural stereotypes. I would recommend it not only to Christians, but also to those who are seeking more information about him, or are dissatisfied with the stereotypes. For further reading, especially reading that focuses on a more chronological look at Jesus’s life, I’d recommend Philip Yancey’s “The Jesus I Never Knew.”

Disclosure: I received this book free from Baker Books through the Baker Books Bloggers program. The opinions I have expressed are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255….